Etching cream vs sandblasting on glass

An interactive section of TheLetterheads.com

Topics include: Sign Making, Design, Fabrication, Letterheads, Sign Books.

Off Topic Posts may be deleted at the discretion of the web hosts. ABSOLUTELY NO SHARING OF COPYRIGHTED FONTS, CLIP ART, or VIDEOS!

Please take social chit-chat elsewhere!

Moderators: Danny Baronian, Mike Jackson

Post Reply
Robert Schwieger
Posts: 120
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2007 12:38 pm
Location: Nebraska

Etching cream vs sandblasting on glass

Post by Robert Schwieger » Tue Apr 03, 2007 11:04 am

How come glass etching cream does not work reliably when used in place of sandblasting the glass? The etching cream is nice for small quick jobs but I have found that it is not as reliable in producing a consistent chip. Bob

Danny Baronian
Site Admin
Posts: 641
Joined: Wed Apr 07, 2004 2:16 am
Contact:

Post by Danny Baronian » Tue Apr 03, 2007 11:13 am

Bob, etching cream does just that, etch the glass, it will not chip the glass. Even at that, it only provides a light frost.

Glue chipping is a different process altogether. The subject has been throughly discussed on the board, a search will provide more information. Also check out the green page under Rick Glawson > glue chipping - http://www.theletterheads.com/

Danny
Danny Baronian
Baronian Mfg.
CNC Routing & Fabrication
http://www.baronian.com

Kelly Thorson
Posts: 489
Joined: Tue Apr 20, 2004 11:53 pm
Location: Penzance, SK Canada
Contact:

Post by Kelly Thorson » Tue Apr 03, 2007 12:44 pm

Are you speaking of etching vs sandblasting as a preparation for glue chipping? If so, I'm no expert, but I think it is because sandblasting actually causes a minute chipping of the glass that leaves a multitude of surfaces which give the glue a tooth to hold on to. The etching process actually chemically erodes the surface of the glass, and leaves a much smoother surface that the glue can't adhere to as well so you don't get as agressive a chip.
I believe there is no shame in failure. Rather, the shame lies in the loss of all the things that might have been, but for the fear of failure.

Mike Jackson
Site Admin
Posts: 1806
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2004 11:02 pm
Location: Jackson Hole, WY
Contact:

Post by Mike Jackson » Tue Apr 03, 2007 1:45 pm

Robert,
More than likely the bulk of us have simply "heard" that using etching creme will not work well for the chip process, but I'd bet that few of us have actually tried it just to see. Likewise, most of us have seen and felt the texture of the glass once it has been sandblasted and also felt the glass where it has been etched with the creme style acid. Obviously, there would be a big difference. That'd be another reason most of us just trusted what we heard. I wouldn't criticize anyone wanting to try some tests and experiment on some scraps.

Good luck if you try it!

Mike Jackson
Last edited by Mike Jackson on Tue Apr 03, 2007 4:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Mike Jackson / co-administrator
Golden Era Studios
Vintage Ornamental Clip art
Jackson Hole, WY

Photography site:
Teton Images
Jackson Hole photography blog:
Best of the Tetons

Robert Schwieger
Posts: 120
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2007 12:38 pm
Location: Nebraska

Post by Robert Schwieger » Tue Apr 03, 2007 4:26 pm

Yes, I forgot to mention that the use of the etch cream was a prelude to the glue chipping. I would agree, after trying some side-by-side tests that the etching cream produces a smooth ( and frosted) surface and does not provide adequate abrasion for succesful chipping to follow. It does chip but only about 50 to 75% and that is too unpredictable.

Does the age of the etch cream become a factor. Seems I saw a reference to it losing its properties as it ages. My experiments were with 15 year old etch cream.

Appreciate the help.

Bob

Mike Jackson
Site Admin
Posts: 1806
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2004 11:02 pm
Location: Jackson Hole, WY
Contact:

Post by Mike Jackson » Tue Apr 03, 2007 4:39 pm

Robert,
Back when I was messing with that stuff, I tried a lot of different brands and I didn't find any I thought really did a good job for my purposes. I am sure some people have a formula or brand that works for them. I saw a bunch of mirrors etched on the front at K-Mart a few days ago. The etching was okay, not really strong, but the double reflection made it hard to decipher. I wouldn't have tried to sell that product, but I guess some people buy it.

You'd probably want to contact the manufacturer if they are still around and see what they say is a good period for the shelf life.

Mike Jackson
Mike Jackson / co-administrator
Golden Era Studios
Vintage Ornamental Clip art
Jackson Hole, WY

Photography site:
Teton Images
Jackson Hole photography blog:
Best of the Tetons

DAVE SMITH
Posts: 1133
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2004 11:12 am
Location: ENGLAND

Post by DAVE SMITH » Thu Apr 05, 2007 1:45 am

Hello Robert
I made some tests a few years ago with different acid types such as Hydroflouric acid and soda crystals ,this formulation gives a white tone which I tested for chipping and found it much to smooth for this process. I also tried ammonium bifluoride mixed with warm water to dissolve the crystals then poured off the surplas which gives an instant smooth etch to the glass much like white acid. I tried this for chipping and had only 50% success like yourself( there was no grip due to smoothness.) I have used the etching paste for upright work but never for chipping. I once tried sandblasting a panel of glass very lightly, you could see clear glass in places it chipped in the normal manner but with a highly polished round chip to the pattern . You may have tried this but I also found etching cream gets very thick in the pot and starts to go hard on the sides ,if this happens put the container of etching cream in a seperate pot and pour boiling water round the sides and leave it stand for 10 minutes it will disolve and become thin and creamy again. Fine sandblasting 320 grit with a thin layer of glue may be worth an experiment also.
Dave

Sarah King
Posts: 169
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 8:43 pm
Location: Oak Park IL
Contact:

Post by Sarah King » Sat Apr 07, 2007 12:27 am

This is a bit off track, but Dave mentioned glue and I was reminded of an article in Glass Craftsman magazine. (June/July 2004) Janet Zambai used dried Elmer's glue as a sandblast resist. She painted it on with a brush and let it dry hard (at least overnight) before blasting. When you're done you just wash it off.

I tried this and it worked very well. You can get much more organic and realistic effects than you ever could by cutting a vinyl resist. She had a wonderful, very detailed scene of pine trees, grizzly bears and fish. Really a neat idea - even if it 's not about glue chipping.
Sarah King
AngelGilding.com

Martin J Halpin
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2019 9:36 pm

Re: Etching cream vs sandblasting on glass

Post by Martin J Halpin » Mon Jan 28, 2019 9:50 pm

Hi guys,
I am new to this forum, and have a question about glass etching cream that one of you might be good enough to help me with. I've just tried the Armour etch cream for the first time, had fun using it & loved the results. I did notice however, that the finish in areas of more than a couple of square inches was very patchy. After I'd read the instructions a little more closely, I saw that this is a trait of the cream but I was wondering if anyone knows of a way to apply the cream that might give a more even finish to the etching? For what I needed it to do, it was wonderful, but I would like to make it a little better if anyone could advise me how to do it :)
Thanks for reading,
Martin

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 10 guests