Interesting Split Shade Technique...

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Larry White
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Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Larry White » Thu Jun 10, 2010 11:24 am

As I was going through some old sign photos, I came across this Connecticut Insurance sign....
connecticut1web.jpg
connecticut1web.jpg (44.55 KiB) Viewed 5677 times
It has a very eye catching split shade on the main copy.
connecticut5web.jpg
connecticut5web.jpg (60.98 KiB) Viewed 5649 times
connecticut4web.jpg
connecticut4web.jpg (66.02 KiB) Viewed 5651 times
I recon the black background was cut in after the gilding was complete. Then a green glaze was brush faded into the vertical and diagonal letter strokes. The horizontal letter strokes were also blocked in with the green glaze. When dry, the red and white split shade colors were added. It's a nice effect....I'll have to try it someday.....someday....

-Aho!


.

Jerry Berg
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Jerry Berg » Thu Jun 10, 2010 1:26 pm

Nice, thanks for the post Larry!

Tony Segale
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Tony Segale » Fri Jun 11, 2010 12:57 pm

... and maybe faster than us.
and he took that golden hair and made a sweater for baby bear.
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Anthony Bennett
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Anthony Bennett » Fri Jun 11, 2010 4:27 pm

"Fast Larry"eh ?

NIce share, interesting piece.

oatis
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by oatis » Thu Jul 22, 2010 4:52 pm

Larry: I looked closely at the example, and recognize that the shade was applied in a slightly different manner than you have deduced.

The white and red were actually applied as transparent varnish glazes, first, and allowed to dry.

The green was applied last. The artist probably had dark green, medium green and white cups of color, and did some blending as he filled the opaque layer.

That is the way I do split blended shades. It accounts for the way the red (in this example) goes straight to brown when the green is placed behind it.

With some thought in the selection of glaze tints and backing color, great combinations are possible.

Keep up YOUR amazing work!

Mark Oatis

Doug Bernhardt
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Doug Bernhardt » Thu Jul 22, 2010 6:14 pm

I agree with Mark. Noel Weber demonstrated this technique when I first met him. My only reservation is that the green and white may have been added simultaneously leaving the need for only the red shade as a glaze......after cutting in the backgnd colour. Sure would help to see the back.

Larry White
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Larry White » Fri Sep 16, 2016 5:40 pm

6 years ago, I mentioned I might like to try this shading style someday....
That day is tomorrow....but we do it MY way!
Larry White
That's enough for now... it's gettin' late
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Tyler Tim
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Tyler Tim » Fri Sep 16, 2016 10:15 pm

Can hardly wait to see your take on it Larry.
Sure I paint thing for my amusement and then offer them for sale. A brushslinger could whither en die from lack of creativity in this plastic town my horse threw a shoe in. :shock:

Larry White
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Larry White » Wed Sep 21, 2016 11:31 am

A gang of us descended upon Ron Percell's Micro Meet
up in Petaluma, CA. Figured it best I bring my own project,
and I thought it would be a good idea to finish this one up quick....
FinishEmUpWeb.jpg
FinishEmUpWeb.jpg (85.17 KiB) Viewed 4383 times
FinishEmUpWebDetail.jpg
FinishEmUpWebDetail.jpg (113.64 KiB) Viewed 4382 times
I executed it as described at the beginning of this post.
Larry White
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Tyler Tim
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Tyler Tim » Wed Sep 21, 2016 11:50 am

Looks fantastic Larry. What glaze did you use or how did you mix it :?:
Sure I paint thing for my amusement and then offer them for sale. A brushslinger could whither en die from lack of creativity in this plastic town my horse threw a shoe in. :shock:

Larry White
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Larry White » Wed Sep 21, 2016 11:58 am

Its transparent screen ink in varnish.
Larry White
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Lee Littlewood
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Lee Littlewood » Wed Oct 05, 2016 6:23 pm

So, to recap for those of us whose memories can't manage 6 posts up:
1) Cut the glass, drill the glass, nip the glass
1a) Lettering with fumed acid etch, spray silver, shell infill, mirror borders.... (you know, the usual stuff)
2) Opaque black background cut in, leaving "shades" still clear glass
3) Green glaze brushed in over part of the clear glass and let dry
4) Red (opaque or glaze?) shade brushed in close to letters and let dry
5) Opaque white applied over all
6) Checked off 'to do' list

I prob'ly missed a few critical steps.
Sure looks bright and pretty
where am i? Now, when i need me...

Larry White
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Larry White » Fri Oct 07, 2016 11:48 am

Close...it actually went more like this....
1) Cut glass, nip the edge, then drill the holes (if you drill the holes prior to nipping the edge, there will be a weak spot at the hole and the stress of nipping could break the glass at that weak spot)
2) Apply computer cut mask of the lettering brightlines for acid etching.
3) Did a 3 pass face up acid emboss on the letter outlines.
4) Solution silvered entire piece, pouring method.
5) Backed up the silvering on the acid embossed letter outlines and perimeter border, clean excess silver off.
6) Cut in background in Prussian Blue japan color, leaving the shade areas clear.
7) A green glaze was brushed in over part of the clear glass in a fading style and let dry.
8 ) Opaque red japan color shade brushed in for split shade effect and let dry.
9) Opaque white applied over all in the shade areas.
10) Two different types of shell were mosaiced into the letter centers using varnish.
11) Shell letter centers were again varnished and fine mica flakes were applied to the voids between the shell pieces.
12) Entire inscription was again varnished and backed with aluminum foil.
13) Entire backside was flocked.
14) Hangers installed and hung on wall.
15) Crossed of the "to do" list.
Larry White
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Dan Seese
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Dan Seese » Sat Oct 08, 2016 8:50 am

So, Larry, the only thing I don't quite understand is the opaque red japan color for the split shade.
Seems like it would need to be a transparent red ink. But are you saying you did the entire shaded area - the green and the red - with a transparent green glaze. Then when you painted the opaque red, it basically "overpowered" the green glaze? And at what point did you do the blend on the shadow? Was it after you did the green - or is that what you mean by "fading style"? The blended shading is much stronger on the red than the green - which appropriately makes the silver outlines pop - but maybe it's just the opaque red that causes the bolder shading.
Guess I should try it myself and see what happens!
Thanks for the photos and explanation.
Dan
"The lyf so short, the craft so long to lerne."
Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1340 - 1400)

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Tyler Tim
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Tyler Tim » Sat Oct 08, 2016 11:51 pm

7) A green glaze was brushed in over part of the clear glass in a fading style and let dry.

Dan I believe he did a light green wash and built up more glaze to define the shade from lighter to darker.

That's my take from it.
Sure I paint thing for my amusement and then offer them for sale. A brushslinger could whither en die from lack of creativity in this plastic town my horse threw a shoe in. :shock:

Larry White
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Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2004 4:18 am

Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Larry White » Tue Oct 11, 2016 4:52 pm

Correct...the green glaze was "brush blended" in a fading technique over the entire
open shade area.That's what produces the fading green color. This was the
only glaze color used. After it was dry, the opaque red was applied. What you see
is the true red color and the changing of the red color as it shows through the
fading transparent green glaze. After that, the only open area that was left, was
blocked in with white. The white then fades to green as it shows through the fading
transparent green glaze. Hopefully that makes sense...
Larry White
That's enough for now... it's gettin' late
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Dan Seese
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Re: Interesting Split Shade Technique...

Post by Dan Seese » Wed Oct 12, 2016 7:42 am

Thanks Tim & Larry.
Yes, that makes perfect sense. I've never done it that way but can definitely see how that works. When the opaque red backs up its complementary color of green, a nice natural shade results.
I likes it.
Dan
"The lyf so short, the craft so long to lerne."
Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1340 - 1400)

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