Toughened glass

An interactive section of TheLetterheads.com

Topics include: Sign Making, Design, Fabrication, Letterheads, Sign Books.

Off Topic Posts may be deleted at the discretion of the web hosts. ABSOLUTELY NO SHARING OF COPYRIGHTED FONTS, CLIP ART, or VIDEOS!

Please take social chit-chat elsewhere!

Moderators: Danny Baronian, Mike Jackson

Post Reply
DAVE SMITH
Posts: 1132
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2004 11:12 am
Location: ENGLAND

Toughened glass

Post by DAVE SMITH » Thu May 31, 2012 1:47 pm

Hi Everyone. I have a question concerning the black two part epoxy nazdar paint ADE 52. I’m painting this two part ink directly onto toughened glass ( I think it's known as tempered in the States) I am wondering if this is a problem for adhesion and strength? Would it be the same as painting directly to float glass? I normally jitter bug the surface of the glass with cerium to give some key for the paint, would it still be possible with toughened glass? I personally can't see any difference but still good to put the question out with you people.


thanks
Dave

Larry White
Posts: 1140
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2004 4:18 am

Re: Toughened glass

Post by Larry White » Thu May 31, 2012 2:32 pm

Nah.... you won't see any difference in the way "toughened" glass acts as opposed to regular annealed float glass. Although you can't depth carve it, and a resulting glue chip pattern is less desireable than what you'd get on float glass.

-WB
Larry White
That's enough for now... it's gettin' late
Town Of Machine
http://www.walljewelry.com

pat mackle
Posts: 156
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 5:35 pm

Re: Toughened glass

Post by pat mackle » Thu May 31, 2012 3:44 pm

I agree with Larry. However "toughened glass" can mean glass that has been heat strengthened/toughened or chemically strengthened, NOT fully "tempered" as in the tempered glass that breaks into small grains. Toughened glass may take a bit more of an impact to break it, but it will still break into bigger shards that can wound you.
You should have no problem jitterbugging it with a fine grit sand paper.
Pat

DAVE SMITH
Posts: 1132
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2004 11:12 am
Location: ENGLAND

Re: Toughened glass

Post by DAVE SMITH » Thu May 31, 2012 4:23 pm

Peace of mind! Thanks Larry and Pat.
Dave

BruceJackson
Posts: 231
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2004 7:28 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Contact:

Re: Toughened glass

Post by BruceJackson » Fri Jun 08, 2012 6:27 am

My most recent project was on toughened glass and I had an interesting conversation with a glass specialist recently about it. He does a lot with kiln-work as well as sand-blasting. He told me that toughened actually scratches more easily than float.

I always assumed the toughening process caused lots of tension in the surface, as though it was pulling in on itself. His comment was that all the internal tension that increases it's strength is actually happening inside the glass, not just at the surface...I don't suppose it actually makes much difference in the way we use it, but his observation of the softness of the surface is worth noting.

Incidentally, this is the fully toughened, explodes into a million fragments type of glass...not just heat-tempered for some additional strength.

DAVE SMITH
Posts: 1132
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2004 11:12 am
Location: ENGLAND

Re: Toughened glass

Post by DAVE SMITH » Fri Jun 08, 2012 7:16 am

Great advice Bruce. I keyed the glass up , Paint is on now and drying.


Thanks
Dave

BruceJackson
Posts: 231
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2004 7:28 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Contact:

Re: Toughened glass

Post by BruceJackson » Sat Jun 09, 2012 2:59 am

I'm curious about why you are using an epoxy?

I can only assume it's because you intend to do some chemical silvering for a mirror background afterwards.

Is there another reason for choosing this material?

(for any new readers who aren't familiar with mirroring/epoxies....if you want to make a decorated mirror and paint some design on glass with the intention of getting a mirror background, epoxy paints/inks are a good choice because they are capable of withstanding the alkaline process. Normal oil-based lettering enamel doesn't play well with the ammonia used during the silver deposition and the color will probably bloom into the silver.)

Lee Littlewood
Posts: 219
Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2004 2:36 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: Toughened glass

Post by Lee Littlewood » Sat Jun 09, 2012 3:04 pm

Bruce,

BLESSINGS ON YOU. That has indeed been a problem for us and we never heard about the advantages of epoxy inks.
Oh goody goody goody
where am i? Now, when i need me...

DAVE SMITH
Posts: 1132
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2004 11:12 am
Location: ENGLAND

Re: Toughened glass

Post by DAVE SMITH » Wed Jun 13, 2012 12:08 am

Hi Bruce. I would normally use this type of paint for the silvering process but this time I wanted something harder and stronger attached to the glass for the signs I am making. No other reason just a reliable paint that stays adheared to the glass.

Dave

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 18 guests