Sign painting with low temperatures

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Olivier Gaudry
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Location: France - Toulouse
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Sign painting with low temperatures

Post by Olivier Gaudry » Thu Nov 28, 2013 8:35 am

Hello there ...

i've already searched on the forum about the subject without success.

I just wanted to know if it's an obligation to use an hardener when you need to paint in a cold environment
where temperatures are between 30° to 40° F ?
And what if the environment is warm and the support (like a glass) is cold ?

Hoping to be clear enough :) Thanks to those who will answer me !

Olivier.

Tyler Tim
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Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 12:12 am

Re: Sign painting with low temperatures

Post by Tyler Tim » Thu Nov 28, 2013 6:45 pm

As to adding hardener I really only used it when washing the lettering would be done... vehicles... boats or windows. Normal signs, paint as it came out of the can. Cold temps and lack of dexterity with a brush after a short time was something I try avoided at all cost. A hot/fast thinner would be more important... in cold temps and some type of radiant heater if the job could not be handle at another time (warmer) or shop painted panels. If the temperature of the substrate is that cold and you place warm paint upon it, a condescension layer can form between the two and adhesion can be an issue.

Now I've painted widows in cold mid 30's temps by placing sheets of 2" foam iboard on the outside of the glass as a thermo barrier and used a small heater fan to move air across the pane on the inside... usually by the time you've clean the window and placed your pattern the glass has warmed up... with good results.


Good Luck and get some fingerless wool gloves.
Sure I paint thing for my amusement and then offer them for sale. A brushslinger could whither en die from lack of creativity in this plastic town my horse threw a shoe in. :shock:

Robare M. Novou
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Re: Sign painting with low temperatures

Post by Robare M. Novou » Fri Nov 29, 2013 2:00 pm

Olivier,

From my knowledge and experience with One Shot hardener is that it is used mainly to fortify One Shot lettering enamels against the evils of lifting when a clear urethane coat is applied over said lettering enamels.

Also, One Shot lettering enamel paint mixed with One Shot hardener is...now get this...hard on the brush.

Be aware that If you have a favorite brush that you use with the mixture of One Shot lettering enamels / One Shot hardener, it will quickly become your least favorite brush.

Unbeknownst to the average letterer, the paint/hardener mixture tends to harden in the heel of the brush rather quickly as you go merrily lettering along.

Dried paint in the heel of a brush is not a good thing...but dried and hardened...Double Bad.!

Frequent brush cleaning as you go helps to minimize the damage.

That said, if you constantly abuse your favorite brush with the paint/hardener mixture...the brush will die a premature death.

I tend to stay away from that paint/hardener combo unless absolutely necessary.

And as far as that combo being better for use in cold weather you would have to ask someone else.

And Timmy...it's "threw"...not "thru". ;)

RMN
What's On Your Book Shelf ?

http://www.milwaukeesignworks.com

Tyler Tim
Posts: 201
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 12:12 am

Re: Sign painting with low temperatures

Post by Tyler Tim » Fri Nov 29, 2013 2:38 pm

Robby... knew that, sometimes I suffer from brain, eye, finger disconnect disorder... :?.

Thanks
Sure I paint thing for my amusement and then offer them for sale. A brushslinger could whither en die from lack of creativity in this plastic town my horse threw a shoe in. :shock:

Kent Smith
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Re: Sign painting with low temperatures

Post by Kent Smith » Sat Nov 30, 2013 10:55 pm

Low temp reducer is specifically made for this purpose, allowing the solvent drying process to accelerate. Having said that, the dryer in the paint will solidify at temperatures below 40 F. and therefore not cure the paint. It may dry but its adhesion is compromised and it will not last. The hardener is only to give the enamel a hard protective topset to resist subsequent exposure to solvents (and hot solvent based paints and clears ie urethanes), abrasion, chipping as well as higher gloss for UV reflection.

Olivier Gaudry
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Joined: Wed Jun 19, 2013 9:47 am
Location: France - Toulouse
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Re: Sign painting with low temperatures

Post by Olivier Gaudry » Tue Dec 03, 2013 4:08 am

Thank you guys for all your responses.
According to all of you, it seems that the hardener is not a necessary. Only for some particular cases ... and if it's gonna damaged my brushes, no way !

I'll follow Tim's advices and get a small heater with fingerless wool gloves :)

Merci !
O.

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