No news?

An interactive section of TheLetterheads.com

Topics include: Sign Making, Design, Fabrication, Letterheads, Sign Books.

Off Topic Posts may be deleted at the discretion of the web hosts. ABSOLUTELY NO SHARING OF COPYRIGHTED FONTS, CLIP ART, or VIDEOS!

Please take social chit-chat elsewhere!

Moderators: Danny Baronian, Mike Jackson

BruceJackson
Posts: 231
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2004 7:28 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by BruceJackson » Mon Nov 14, 2011 11:48 pm

Hi Erik,
You misunderstood me. I don't mean a hole for ventilation.

The air gap I refer to is a space between the back of the glass panel and the wall behind it.

The principle idea is that nothing should touch the back of the splashback. Or more accurately, nothing should touch the paint that has been applied to the back of the glass.

This same principle applies to glass pictures, signs or mirrors mounted in a frame...It's not good to have any backing board up hard against the glass panel.

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Tue Nov 15, 2011 1:24 am

That is what I understood Bruce.
Where is the hole?
If it is on top, I can imagine that water will sip in and drip to the bottom and could eventually peel of the work.
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

Anthony Bennett
Posts: 316
Joined: Tue May 11, 2010 4:50 am
Location: England
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by Anthony Bennett » Tue Nov 15, 2011 1:31 pm

Thanks for the step by step Bruce, I understand.
The wife has her eyes on my replacing our current splashback so.......

Im still saving up to come visit.

Erik, don't think drainage, think cavity wall insulation and you will get it.

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Wed Dec 14, 2011 9:55 am

I think Doug will like this one maybe even more then the rest.
One and a half year ago in my quests for knowledge I became aquinted with some of the best painting framers in the world.
Two of them live in the Netherlands where they are still needed for making elaborate frames for newly made paintings but maybe even more for old paintings where the owners want their painting being reframed in a periodic style that it the same as the painting it self.
Great artists, a world on its own and years and years of learning before you can call yourself a good framebuilder.
Here your treat of today a link, that (I hope it works) will be translated into English by Google translate in microsoft internet explorer:
Making original frames from years gone by...

Erik
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

Lee Littlewood
Posts: 218
Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2004 2:36 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by Lee Littlewood » Thu Dec 15, 2011 3:01 am

Eric,
Nice videos of the Cafe Club Brandon. Hanging over the side of a ladder is hard enough - doing it with a fine script is what we would call "hairy". Good show.

I was in Amsterdam for a day and 1/2 last March, so I ran around with a camera looking for signs. I saw only one gilded window sign, but a few of the traditional cafes with script on the windows. Is it always on the outside of the glass? Are there any left where the letters are on window screen?

Here is one I admired - the small lettering for the hours has about 3/4" capitals. White paint on the outside of glass windows. Hot stuff.
Attachments
Hours.jpg
Hours.jpg (152.73 KiB) Viewed 11069 times
Int Aepjen.jpg
Int Aepjen.jpg (111.47 KiB) Viewed 11066 times
Cafe Int Aepjen.jpg
Cafe Int Aepjen.jpg (163.17 KiB) Viewed 11077 times

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Thu Dec 15, 2011 5:19 am

Lee,

I bet you had a great time visiting Amsterdam. Looks like you were on one of the right spots.

The windows you photographed belong to one of the two remaining houses left in Amsterdam which still have their original wooden facade.
After a big cityfire in the year 1421 the city councel made a law that all the remaining houses and houses that were to be build had to have their side walls made out of brick stone.
So that a future fire would not go to the neighbours house quickly. In this process the remaining houses with a wooden facade were also covered with brick stones during the next centuries.
So the fact that this wooden facade is still there, is very remarkable.

The history of this particular building is also enjoyable:
Build right on the entrance of the city (port) of merchant medieval Amsterdam it was a public inn.
Here sailors stayed after being months on sea traveling to and from the east-indies, japan, australia or china.
After months of only man on a small boat they needed fun, food, drinks and woman! (beginning of the red light district).
When they arived home in Amsterdam, the lonely sailors finally got paids for their months of work; in those days they were loaded with money.
But were money is, there is gambling and other fices. After a week or two when the next depature was due, they had to pay their bills and more then often the sailors were dragged out of the inn drunk, with gambling debts and unable to pay their bill to the landlord.
In the sixteenhundreds there was this one sailor who brought with him an exotic animal: an ape.
For everyday man in Amsterdam this was a real special thing and certainly the talk of the town.
When he had to go to his next sailing journey, you guessed it, he could not pay the bill.
He said to the landlord: "If I lend you the monkey as a downpayment untill i get back, so i can retreive my monkey when i pay you with my next earnings".
The landlord agreed and smiled at the prospect of having such a sight in his inn.
The next months the inn was the talk of the town with its monkey sitting on a stick next to the bar.
After a year the sailor did not come back and the monkey was doing his act at the bar for all the visitors.
Then after two years people realised that the ship which the sailor went away with must have sunk in one of the big oceans.
And indeed, the monkey spend the rest of his living days in the inn.
As you can imagine, hygiene in those days was not very common. Especialy not in a public hotel were sailors slept, who probably did not wash themselves for weeks on a role.
The beds were full of flees and bedbugs and it was commonly known that it was no happy trip to sleep in 'that inn where the monkey lives'.
After all these years we in the Netherlands still have the saying/retoric question, when you are covered with insect bites, were hasselt or something bad has been done to you: "You must have stayed in the monkey place/Zeker in het aapje gelogeerd?".
And therefore since the sixteen century the inn has been named: "In 't Aepjen".

Now the handpainting on the windows......
For two years now i have been studying the lettering done on pub windows in the netherlands, Belgium and especially in Amsterdam.
The script is a typicall Dutch script derived from a penscript invented by Adriaen van de Velde around 1604.
This script is the precender (some of you will be in shock) of the english penscripts we all know so well.
In the year 1952 the brewery 'Amstel' asked this housepainter and handletter (Wim) to handletter all the windows of their pubs.
Wim took on the job and made the lettering in his own style derived from the sixteenth century script.
And soon this style became a trademark of Amsterdam.
Unfortunatly he died in 1986 and the brewery was looking for someone who coulddo the lettering for new bars or broken pub windows.
They asked some other man (Leo) if he could do it and he stepped in the scriptstyle and continued to handletter the pub windows untill 7 years ago.

Leo unfortunatly suffered from a stroke 7 years ago, making it unpossible to handletter anymore (bound to a wheelchair).
For a year now I am in contact with him and visit him at his home where he tells me old stories about his working days, aproach, paints, brushes and techniques while I prepare dinner for him in his kitchen while he pours large amounts of brandy, whiskey or whatever distilled alcahol is available under his table. He is a down to earth nice guy eith great stories and without knowing it a very important guy for the cultural identity of Amsterdam.

When researching the script, I noticed different handstyles on the different pub windows. Letters are done differently, some more then others. This made me wander who Leo's precersor was. I searched and searched and found the name Wim. Then I found his daughter and since two months I am in contact with her and she gathered her 7 sisters and brothers (those were the days) to find everything there is to find of her father and his work. She told me the most horrific story that after her father died, the kids decided that all those hundreds of drawings, designs and true size pouncing papers had to be thrown away.
My mouth dropped when i heard this and could allmost cry (I am a guy who reads my old books with cotton gloves). And just the idea that all this history, all these step by steps, all these timecapsules are gone forever makes me sick in the stomach.
But.... there is hope, she emailed me last week that all the kids are looking for old handlettered cards, photo's, drawings etc. that was from their father and that in january she will meet me with her brother to talk about her dad and his work.
I took it upon me to document everything there is to know about this script and the craftsmen behind it.

So... now for these windows Lee photographed.
1. The windows were allmost allways painted from the outside, Leo told me that the reading is better that way.
But if the client incisted painting in reverse it was no problem for these guys.
Moisture and damp heat in the cafe's, bars or pubs could peel the paint of after 50 years.
Yes the lettering lasted for at least 50 years!
2. Lettering on windowscreens was not done in Amsterdam.
3. If I remember correct, the lettering on the door is done with a mask.

Hope you liked my little history story.
I think it is allways nicer to see something when you know something more about it.
A shame you were in Amsterdam for just a day.

By the way Pat do you remember this pub, we walked by it when you were here.

Erik
Last edited by erik winkler on Thu Dec 15, 2011 2:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

Patrick Mackle
Posts: 470
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2004 10:21 am
Location: Monrovia, Ca.
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by Patrick Mackle » Thu Dec 15, 2011 12:06 pm

Yes Eric, I do remember that pub, as well as all the other hidden jewels that delighted me while we biked and walked together.
When things get too stressed around here lately, I escape to my memories and find myself reliving our traveling around over there. I had a great time, and much of it was especially enjoyable due to your wonderful love of historical facts and sharing what you have gathered. It will always be one of the high points in my life. The post above is a fine example of your thirst for past history, attention to detail, and making sure it is not soon forgotten.
Pat

Mike Simpson
Posts: 35
Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 10:33 pm
Location: Montrose, CO
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by Mike Simpson » Fri Dec 16, 2011 8:36 am

Erik,
Even though I've never been there, I very much enjoyed your history lesson.
Thanks.

Mike
Mike Simpson
picture framemaker and artist
http://www.mikesimpsonart.com

Lee Littlewood
Posts: 218
Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2004 2:36 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by Lee Littlewood » Sat Dec 17, 2011 1:45 am

Eric,

Many thanks for the history info and language lesson. So this date over the door of Int Aepjen is actually correct???

Here are a few other examples of script I saw, just so people don't think we're making this all up. And yes, I did see some in white vinyl, but that just shows that there is an appreciation of "what looks right".
Attachments
Anno1519.jpg
Anno1519.jpg (92.31 KiB) Viewed 10920 times
deOoievaar2.jpg
deOoievaar2.jpg (142.5 KiB) Viewed 10932 times
deOoievaar1.jpg
deOoievaar1.jpg (134.25 KiB) Viewed 10932 times
DeZeepostsmall.jpg
DeZeepostsmall.jpg (134.92 KiB) Viewed 10934 times

Lee Littlewood
Posts: 218
Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2004 2:36 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by Lee Littlewood » Sat Dec 17, 2011 2:03 am

...and I had to post these to The Hand Lettering Forum.

You don't see a "typographic" casual very often, more's the pity. I'm guessing it is because it is hard to get a good flow of paint from a flat brush, and hard to keep a good chisel when using a quill (american name for a signpainting brush - what are they called in Europe?). I think these red letters had been double-coated. The brick wall looked like it had been painted 50 times.
Attachments
Oost-West1.jpg
Oost-West1.jpg (125.65 KiB) Viewed 10923 times
Oost-West2.jpg
Oost-West2.jpg (86.24 KiB) Viewed 10921 times
Oost-West2a.jpg
Oost-West2a.jpg (163.18 KiB) Viewed 10916 times

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Sat Dec 17, 2011 2:14 am

Yes Lee the dates is right if not older...
I recognize the houses they were made further down the road in the same street.

Erik
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Sun Dec 18, 2011 7:17 am

Last few weeks I have comitted myself to also learn immitation techniques and I thought it would be interesting to show the progress.
I have been painting oak wood graining and teak wood graining.
Tools used are brushes, eyes and braincells; anyone could do it.

First try on oak wood panel.
1 Oak.jpg
1 Oak.jpg (41.34 KiB) Viewed 10888 times
Painting oak wood panel at home.
2 Painting oak at home.jpg
2 Painting oak at home.jpg (85.04 KiB) Viewed 10894 times
Painting oak wood panel at home.
3 Painting oak at home.jpg
3 Painting oak at home.jpg (59.56 KiB) Viewed 10899 times
First try on teak wood panel.
6 Teak panel 1.jpg
6 Teak panel 1.jpg (58.58 KiB) Viewed 10888 times
Detail of the first try teak wood panel.
7 Detail teak panel 1.jpg
7 Detail teak panel 1.jpg (53 KiB) Viewed 10905 times
Second teak wood panel.
8 teak panel 2.JPG
8 teak panel 2.JPG (59.32 KiB) Viewed 10893 times
Second teak wood panel, photographed from a different angle.
9 Different light teak panel 2.JPG
9 Different light teak panel 2.JPG (61.24 KiB) Viewed 10891 times
Erik
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Sun Dec 18, 2011 7:41 am

And some more:

At work on a teak wood panel.
10 At work with teak panel.JPG
10 At work with teak panel.JPG (62.31 KiB) Viewed 10890 times
Detail of teak wood panel.
11 Detail teak panel 2.JPG
11 Detail teak panel 2.JPG (56.99 KiB) Viewed 10899 times
Detail teak wood panel.
12 Detail teak panel 2.JPG
12 Detail teak panel 2.JPG (53.01 KiB) Viewed 10891 times
O yeah more 'news', I forgot to mention that last year I became a member of the International Society of Gilders.
Lost of passionate people, from all over the world, who want to learn or have been gilding glass for years hang out with Noel Webber in his returning workshop.
Noel told me that when Rick Glawson died they took it upon him and his partner in the workshop John Studdun to keep the passion, friendship and craft of gilding glass alive.
Erik as a Society of Gilders member.JPG
Erik as a Society of Gilders member.JPG (72.02 KiB) Viewed 10891 times
Ofcourse I asked if I could be member 13.
Ofcourse I chose member number 13.JPG
Ofcourse I chose member number 13.JPG (73.89 KiB) Viewed 10866 times
Well I am off to gild some glass and do a French style design I made for fun.
It has been a while, sometimes circumstances just prohibit to do the things you like.
Will show it to a colleque who, just like mister Helle, works in Paris and is doing a lot of gilding on glass.
I am certain he will like it, he is a true glass gilding master and loves the old techniques.

Erik
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Wed Dec 21, 2011 1:25 pm

More news.
This year in March I went to England to pick up an original Brilliant Cutting setup from an old guy who wanted to sell it.
He had it in his garage and it was collecting dust for years.
I took the van from our firm and made the trip to the island by ferry boat.
There it was: a wooden frame with a bunch of old cutting stones (some broken) and a rusty very old electric engine.
I was very sceptical at seeing all the rusty stuff, that looked like a pile of garbage but took it home with me.
The man strangly asked me not to reveal his name, because he did not want anybody to know I bought it from him.
When I came home I realised that the work had just begun:
1. The broken cutting wheels were ready for the dumpster.
2. The heavy electric engine, which allmost broke my back when lifting it, was a completly rusted blob.
3. A lot of the nice delicate small wheels needed for small detailed cutting where not in the collection.
4. A lot of wheels did not had correct metal rods and some of the rods that where there, did not matched the cutting wheels.

All in all a lot of work to get this project up and running.
I took an old motor of a wood lathe machine which we still had and worked on the system step by step to get it working correctly.
In this video you can see me dressing a wheel.
Dressing a stone wheel

But then bad luck arrived, brother (bussiness partner) and mother got hospitalized.
After 4 months of sitting next to my brother's hospital bed, he is completely recovered, mother is still in the process of her illness.
I realized that my emotional energy to work on glass and signs was completely paralised.
Work and especially working on glass doesn't matter when these things happen to your beloved ones.

Today finally after six months we heard some good news regarding my mother, so energy is creeping back to me and I feel up to it to continue my battle with the brilliant cutting setup getting to work.
This is for me the moment to give my respect to the masters from the turn of the century who worked on the glass in times where supplies were not allways common to get a hold on.
Patience and endurance is something that is being taught here.
Besides a mayor cashflow that evaporates into thin air, it is a lot of planning, making mistakes and a lot of building; to get the old machine running.
I hope practising will be on it's way soon.

It will be a christmas not to forget and I hope you will get the best out of your christmas this year also.

Erik
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Fri Dec 30, 2011 9:44 am

A few weeks ago I made a glass panel for a souvenir shop here in downtown Amsterdam.
The client wanted a simple clean design.
Gilding the glass.JPG
Gilding the glass.JPG (210.8 KiB) Viewed 10758 times
Burnishing.JPG
Burnishing.JPG (207.53 KiB) Viewed 10763 times
Ready to hang it.JPG
Ready to hang it.JPG (190.61 KiB) Viewed 10747 times
Ready to hang it detail.JPG
Ready to hang it detail.JPG (200.06 KiB) Viewed 10741 times
Shop view.JPG
Shop view.JPG (102.98 KiB) Viewed 10727 times
Shop view close up.JPG
Shop view close up.JPG (92.88 KiB) Viewed 10748 times
Happy new year!
Erik
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

Patrick Mackle
Posts: 470
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2004 10:21 am
Location: Monrovia, Ca.
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by Patrick Mackle » Fri Dec 30, 2011 5:26 pm

Erik,
That's nice clean work. I especially like the "Patrick" part.
Pat

Ingrid Mager
Posts: 75
Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 12:23 am

Re: No news?

Post by Ingrid Mager » Sun Jan 01, 2012 1:34 am

erik winkler wrote:More news.
1. The broken cutting wheels were ready for the dumpster.
3. A lot of the nice delicate small wheels needed for small detailed cutting where not in the collection.
You probably have already talked to Kurt Merker, but in case you haven't he has all sorts of stone wheels for purchase in coarse to fine grits. It is really horribly expensive to ship them to the US so I have not ordered any from him, but to Holland it should not be bad.. . or you could just drive there.

Too bad some of the wheels in your set were broken - ( I FEEL your pain!) I hope they didn't break in transit like a few of my original ones did. I also hope you were able to salvage at least of few of the really big beauties. The right ones are very hard to come by, at least out here in the States.

After a lot of work and hunting, I have had the great fortune of finding a set of wheels from an old working glass shop in the Midwest and will be driving another 2000+ miles to go pick them up sometime next month. I don't know exactly what I will be getting except for what I see in the pictures .The larger ones seem to be a bit on the thin side, but for my lighter weight set-up, this might be just what I need as long as I can keep a good steady mount so I won't have to grind away lots of stone each time I am changing wheels. (I don't have a fixed spindle set-up, you know.....at least not yet!. But I really love my little Somer & Maca nonetheless!)

There are even a few old style cast iron wheels in the set....they are the ones where a steady stream of sand used to trickle down on them from a vessel, suspended above the machine. It sure will be interesting to have them as collection pieces and some day I will probably get to play with them, even if just for the fun of it.
Cast Iron Wheels.jpg
Cast iron wheels!
Cast Iron Wheels.jpg (43.61 KiB) Viewed 10669 times
DSCN9694-1.JPG
nice looking variety of small wheels. . .many look to have been originally used for edging
DSCN9694-1.JPG (53.17 KiB) Viewed 10637 times
DSCN9696-1.JPG
Some medium large diameters
DSCN9696-1.JPG (53.14 KiB) Viewed 10634 times
Med LArge AO wheels.jpg
Medium large wheels
Med LArge AO wheels.jpg (52.12 KiB) Viewed 10646 times
There's more. . .but it would be much too boring. . .. .

It sure has been a process to say the least. . . finding the bits and pieces to make a system. . .and figuring this all out! And I'll say one thing: these wheels will all be travelling ON A MATTRESS and with TONS of GOOD padding!!
~Inga

PS - By the way, Erik, I have always had some interest in graining. . . know nothing about it except what I have brushed over in some old books quite some time ago...but to my untrained eye, what you have done there looks very, very good to me. Love the teak...especially the last one!

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Sun Jan 01, 2012 5:23 am

Wow Inga that is fabulous news.
You have some great wheels there!
I really like your small ones, the thin ones great for small details.
In my opnion the main issue you must deal with now is how to get a steady mount whith those wheels.
Let me try and give you a tip: Make sure your turning rod is made with a special groove, they can be bought.
They are not very cheap, but you should have to order only one.
When you have secured this rod on your lathe system, do what the old guys did before us:
Dril a concave whole in the centre and make some chips out of the edge of the centre whole, then make a mold of your special groove.
With this mold you could fill the centres of your wheels with molten lead.
I use two component epoxy. Much easier, but not clay-able like lead any more.
The concave whole and chips make sure that the epoxy filling will not drop out of the stone because it has some extra surface to grap on.
Ofcourse make sure the wheels are prefectly horizontal when you poor the mold and later the epoxy, otherwise there is a lot of extra grinding needed on the sides of the wheels to remove the vertical wobling of the wheels and that will make them even thinner.

Merker gave me some quotes two or three years ago, but was very expensive, at this point I think I have what I need.
Ordered a special made diamond punty wheel and some polishing wheels at the shop we have visited.
A lot of money, but as you may know by now, when you start with this, you are traped in quicksand and you can not come out unless you go for it!

The graining is something special, I can promote it for everyone.
I have a lot of books about the techniques, some bad some good, but to see an old master doing it before your eyes is the best way to learn. The fact that I have read the books and techniques and tried to imagine what they are writting has helped me a lot and makes me a very fast student. A lot of fun and very interesting to hang out with these old teachers.

Hope your mounting will succeed in a decent way, a perfect setup is very important.
A dutch saying: "The tools makes the craftsman", but as you must know by now, when dealing with brilliant cutting: the craftsman makes the quality cuts.

Good luck.
Erik
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

Ingrid Mager
Posts: 75
Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 12:23 am

Re: No news?

Post by Ingrid Mager » Tue Jan 03, 2012 12:20 am

I think you must be describing the process of using a casting table.
I have poured a little resin, but not threaded lead centers yet, but it wil be the first thing I try with the new wheels.

Remember, you have fixed spindles (turning rods) but I am working with an American style Somer & Macca machine, and the wheels are removed from the shaft each time they are switched, so naturally, I have concerns about re-mounting them sucesfully each time. WIth thicker and smaller wheels it is easy ....but might not be so easy with these bigger but thinner wheels. I may try adding something to the sides of the wheels to give them more thickness so there is more of them to set on the shaft with.

I already have lots of smaller wheels even before I get these new ones, and you have quite a few really large wheels. It really is a shame we were not closer because we could have done some trading and made (2) very nice full sets!

But we wil both make do. . . .and learn to capitalize on what we have!
Inga

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Tue Jan 03, 2012 9:02 am

Interesting object on Ebay.
1.jpg
1.jpg (47.99 KiB) Viewed 10581 times
2.jpg
2.jpg (55.38 KiB) Viewed 10589 times
4.jpg
4.jpg (49.5 KiB) Viewed 10592 times
5.jpg
5.jpg (51.05 KiB) Viewed 10581 times
Good luck.

Erikieee
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Sun Feb 05, 2012 4:13 pm

Sometimes it is hard to do the things you want.
Shortage of money, time, creativity, guts, inspiration or endurance can get the better of you.
For me this last year it is time; work and family takes more time then I have, but finally this weekend I got up and continued working on my French panels. I liked it.
Here is a Sneak preview

Erikieee
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

pat mackle
Posts: 156
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 5:35 pm

Re: No news?

Post by pat mackle » Sun Feb 05, 2012 5:42 pm

Haha, more like a "beak" preview. Is that a French parrot?
By the way, did you know that feathers are good for stirring the acid around when you are etching flashed glass?
Pat

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Thu Feb 16, 2012 4:52 am

Hello, some new pictures to look at.
They were made while I was working during the weekend.

Backing up the second tone of goldleaf.
01 Backing up second tone of goldleaf.jpg
01 Backing up second tone of goldleaf.jpg (123.16 KiB) Viewed 10360 times
02 Backing up second tone of goldleaf.jpg
02 Backing up second tone of goldleaf.jpg (110.28 KiB) Viewed 10354 times
First brush strokes of the painting which will come in the middle of the glass.
03 First brush strokes painting the windmill.jpg
03 First brush strokes painting the windmill.jpg (82.54 KiB) Viewed 10359 times
Chechking and retouching the rear side of the glass to make it perfect in detail.
In these photo's you can see that I will make two versions:
1. With a double gilded border frame.
2. With a handpainted red border frame which will pop out the whitegold oilsize gilded grains more.
04 Work in progress 1.jpg
04 Work in progress 1.jpg (138.39 KiB) Viewed 10363 times
05 Work in progress 2.jpg
05 Work in progress 2.jpg (136.23 KiB) Viewed 10353 times
06 Work in progress 3.jpg
06 Work in progress 3.jpg (101.15 KiB) Viewed 10353 times
07 Work in progress 4.jpg
07 Work in progress 4.jpg (110.07 KiB) Viewed 10354 times
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Thu Feb 16, 2012 5:01 am

A few more photo's
08 Working on details..jpg
08 Working on details..jpg (125.95 KiB) Viewed 10360 times
09 Work in progress bottom detail..jpg
09 Work in progress bottom detail..jpg (114.27 KiB) Viewed 10340 times
10 Checking the details..jpg
10 Checking the details..jpg (131.24 KiB) Viewed 10365 times
Here you can see the extreme small details in the watergilding and oilgilding.
The internet adress on the bottom is 1,5mm high (1/17th of an inch).
Why? I do not know, I just want to do it...
11 Detail.jpg
11 Detail.jpg (129.05 KiB) Viewed 10338 times
Erik
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

bob gamache
Posts: 154
Joined: Tue Sep 22, 2009 5:38 am
Location: New Jersey
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by bob gamache » Thu Feb 16, 2012 6:42 am

Erik that's a beautiful piece! What method are you using to attach the windmill painting to the glass? Nice detail on the gilding. Good job!
Bob Gamache

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Thu Feb 16, 2012 7:23 am

I will have to figure that out again Bob, since my own made mixture of damar varnish and uv speed dry clear etc. failed: it went white and a little opaque.
Some test have to be done, before I will go for it.

Maybe Kent could tell us why damar with uv speed dry clear turns a little opaque and whitish?
As a trst I tried to heat it up with a heatgun, turned clear in an instand and when it cooled down got opaque again.
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

pat mackle
Posts: 156
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 5:35 pm

Re: No news?

Post by pat mackle » Thu Feb 16, 2012 4:17 pm

When you think about it, most coatings are workable either when they are heated, or dissolved in a solvent.
They set up hard when either the solvent evaporates, or the heat dissipates.
I believe that your problem is that these two materials are based on two completely different based resinous materials. Damar varnish is a pretty straight forward material based on a natural plant resin. I believe the OneShot material is more synthesized. The two may appear to mix well and be harmonious as a liquid, but when the solvents evaporate and the solids link up, they turn out to be incompatible causing the foggy white result. By adding the heat from the dryer, you are relaxing the tension as though they were once again solvent together. Just the fact that one might dry harder than the other could create a haze. When you mix strange things together, it is good to know their base, otherwise if the incompatibility does not show up within hours or days, it may show up within a few years.
I also want to say that your piece is really looking nice. I like the details just outside your name. Please post some finished pix.
Pat

Anthony Bennett
Posts: 316
Joined: Tue May 11, 2010 4:50 am
Location: England
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by Anthony Bennett » Fri Feb 17, 2012 4:04 am

Fantastic work Erik, Thanks for posting the pics.

DAVE SMITH
Posts: 1132
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2004 11:12 am
Location: ENGLAND

Re: No news?

Post by DAVE SMITH » Thu Mar 01, 2012 8:05 am

Nice post to find . These look very nice Erik. You have been busy. I seen some panels like this down the back streets in Paris they have that nice period feel.
Dave

erik winkler
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Amsterdam Netherlands
Contact:

Re: No news?

Post by erik winkler » Wed Mar 14, 2012 9:02 am

Thank you Pat, Anthony and Dave.
I have not been bussy with the fancy work to be honoust, still in the problemphase which takes too much of my energy.
But have been working a bit on my brilliant cutting set up which is allmost complete, if it can ever be complete.
At the moment it looks very professional, so now with the good temperatures I can start cutting some test pieces.
No ceriumoxide-polishing or wet-sponge kid needed here for my set up fortunatly, here in Nederland kids are only alloud to work when they are 15 or older.

A nice found in the family archive are these three photo's of my grandfather and dad working in the black and white days.
Ferry Winkler Sr.jpg
Ferry Winkler Sr.jpg (402.41 KiB) Viewed 10016 times
My dad handlettering... if he only new that his kid would be interested in doing this handwork as well.
The funny thing is, I never remembered my dad doing handlettering, so when I came and told him 4 years ago what I have found here, he and my mother were amazed how this could be possible.
Is it something in the genes maybe?

Theo Winkler at Cineton Studios.jpg
Theo Winkler at Cineton Studios.jpg (197.74 KiB) Viewed 10018 times
My grandfather with the decorators crew from Cineton Studios in Amsterdam.
Cineton Studio was the main movie production studio in Nederland and he worked there as a decorator building and painting decors.
This complete group was seized during the second world war and they were forced to work for the Germans in their famous film studios painting the decors for the propaganda movies from that time.
After a year or so he escaped and was able to get back to Amsterdam where he was hidding for the Germans untill they found him again.
I do not know what happened next....

Theo Winkler working in Amsterdam.jpg
Theo Winkler working in Amsterdam.jpg (201.8 KiB) Viewed 10017 times
Here is my grandfather at work leading his crew doing housepainting after the war.
I tried looking the street up in google maps and overcourse I could not rest untill I found the place (that is just me).
Google street view

Erik
Realizing we are in the 2nd renaissance of the arts.
Learn, copy and trying to improve...
Still in the learning phase ;-)
Amsterdam Netherlands
www.ferrywinkler.nl
www.schitterend.eu
www.facebook.com/Schitterend.eu

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests