Quiz

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Kevin W Betz
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:17 am

Quiz

Post by Kevin W Betz » Fri Jan 31, 2014 5:27 pm

How do you Glue Chip Vertically ?

kevin

pat mackle
Posts: 156
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 5:35 pm

Re: Quiz

Post by pat mackle » Fri Jan 31, 2014 5:48 pm

Can you be more specific??

Kevin W Betz
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:17 am

Re: Quiz

Post by Kevin W Betz » Fri Jan 31, 2014 6:38 pm

Say a Customer wants to have a Glue-Chipped window, but the window
is already a part of his Store Front.
How would you do this ?

kevin

Tyler Tim
Posts: 201
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 12:12 am

Re: Quiz

Post by Tyler Tim » Fri Jan 31, 2014 7:08 pm

How do you Glue Chip Vertically ?

kevin
Well first you make a pattern.

Then you cut around the letter V... E... ect.. blasted... heat glue... apply glue... dry glue... spy on glue... poke glue... hope glue chips all... soak glue again. After all that you should have a nice panel with VERTICALLY chipped in it... :lol:

It's been a long cold week.

First thing find out if he "Owns" The Building. Over the years I've had many "Shop Owners" wanted building mod's done... when in fact they did not own the property.

As for chipping upright glass. Had read here I believe... something that involved hand etching brushing or rolling on glue and placing news print onto the glue at some point. As for the results can't say. You maybe able to search out the topic here. If you do move forward with any vertical chipping do take lots of photo's to share.

Tim
Last edited by Tyler Tim on Fri Jan 31, 2014 8:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Sure I paint thing for my amusement and then offer them for sale. A brushslinger could whither en die from lack of creativity in this plastic town my horse threw a shoe in. :shock:

Kevin W Betz
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:17 am

Re: Quiz

Post by Kevin W Betz » Fri Jan 31, 2014 7:44 pm

Tyler, you are correct.
Newspaper is what holds the glue
in place as it sets up.

When doing a Vertical Glue Chip,
apply mask, blast, apply glue,
but a little thicker than normal, maybe
2.5 to 1 ratio. Apply newspaper after 2
minutes. Let rest. 1 hour later, trim
Copy and wait for the chip.

kevin

Tyler Tim
Posts: 201
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 12:12 am

Re: Quiz

Post by Tyler Tim » Fri Jan 31, 2014 8:06 pm

Kevin,

If you have done this... do you have any photo's of completed work? I'll like to see them.

Tim
Sure I paint thing for my amusement and then offer them for sale. A brushslinger could whither en die from lack of creativity in this plastic town my horse threw a shoe in. :shock:

Kevin W Betz
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:17 am

Re: Quiz

Post by Kevin W Betz » Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:32 am

Tyler,,

No I have not done this before.
During my travels, I saw a window
done with this method.
I quite surprised to see how
well his chip came out. I will
see if I can find the Photo
to show you. How do you
Post a Photo ? I have never
done that also.

Kevin

Danny Baronian
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Re: Quiz

Post by Danny Baronian » Sat Feb 01, 2014 12:27 pm

Board Index> The Main Directory> The Hand Lettering Forum:

http://www.handletteringforum.com/forum ... f=2&t=2368
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Danny Baronian
Baronian Mfg.
CNC Routing & Fabrication
http://www.baronian.com

Mike Jackson
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Location: Jackson Hole, WY
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Re: Quiz

Post by Mike Jackson » Tue Feb 04, 2014 11:32 pm

Kevin,

Let me throw out a few comments.

A: Yes, make sure the person asking for glass etching has permission or is the owner.
B: Check to see if the glass is tempered. There might be an etched tag in the corner of the glass indicating that it is. Etching tempered glass is more tricky than regular glass.
C: Besides the issue of being able to pour or adhere the glue to the glass, you must first sandblast it. That could be a huge factor in the process.

D: Depending on the size of the glass and all circumstances, we've found it sometimes cheaper to have a glass company measure and cut a new piece of glass and deliver it to us so we could work on it in the shop. Then have them install it when completed. If you factor in all of the down time and travel time, especially if you leaf the glass on top of all the glue-chipping, you'll have a lot of time involved.

E: Let's see...you also have to worry about glass temperature on location especially on a winter job. Glue chipping in the winter is a different animal than in the dry summer. In Chicago, you might have a lot of humidity all year? If it does chip, you have to worry about the shards of glass chipping off the glass and onto the floor. The area will be a mess for a week or so.

We had to rework a job downtown earlier in the year. It had glue chipping and etching from when we did it over 20 years ago. We paid a glass company to bring the old glass to us and put a temporary one in while we worked on the old one. When finished, they replaced the old glass piece and kept the temporary glass. We priced the job so it was the same either way, and of course, the customer liked the idea of not having their store front in a mess while we worked on it. I keep saying "we" but I had to do it all.

Again, if you do the job on a new piece of glass in your shop, you eliminate a lot of variables and problems.

Lastly, if you do try to do a job like that vertically, go get a piece of glass and practice a few times in your shop. A project like this can have a lot of hidden demons.

Mike Jackson
Mike Jackson / co-administrator
Golden Era Studios
Vintage Ornamental Clip art
Jackson Hole, WY

Photography site:
Teton Images
Jackson Hole photography blog:
Best of the Tetons

Kent Smith
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Location: Estes Park, CO
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Re: Quiz

Post by Kent Smith » Fri Feb 07, 2014 11:18 pm

I believe that vertical work was done before anyone considered the practicality of removing or substituting the glass. While it can be done using newsprint you have less control and it is so much better to make adjustments in the shop or start over for that matter. I have also found vertical work to be a great deal more time consuming and therefore less profitable. That also relates to letting the pros due the glazing, in case one would be tempted.

Kevin W Betz
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:17 am

Re: Quiz

Post by Kevin W Betz » Sun Feb 09, 2014 6:59 pm

Hi Tyler.

Here is the Picture I took. Now that I look at it,
I hope my memory served me right in saying this was a
Vertical Glue Chip. I only recall hearing about this Method.

kevin
Attachments
Kaleidoscope Window.jpg
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Kaleidoscope Window-1.jpg
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Roderick Treece
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Re: Quiz

Post by Roderick Treece » Sun Feb 09, 2014 7:31 pm

What makes you think it was done in place vertically?

pat mackle
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Re: Quiz

Post by pat mackle » Sun Feb 09, 2014 7:55 pm

Of course the first thing to do is decide if the glass is tempered or not. The window may or may not be marked with a tempering label(bug). The most obvious way is to look for distortions in the tin side. Often when float glass is tempered, the residual slight tin coating expands and then contracts in the tempering process. This movement tends to relax and then compress the glass surface which causes the tin to reflect light unevenly. This is dramatically seen in rear car windows as splotchy bluish toned rings (really noticeable in a lot of German cars).
The compression of the tin will often show this disturbance when viewed in reflective light. Another way, if you can get close enough to a corner edge of the glass, is to view it with polarized lens. Tempered glass will have a distinct "rain bow" colored flare appearance at its corners when viewed this way. Another way is to look for very faint "roller marks" on one side of the glass. These are marks that the heat softened glass will pick up as it rolls in a heated plastic state through the tempering oven and before it is rapidly quenched by the curtain of cold air. These marks are even more evident in thicker heavier plates of glass.
Now on to the chipping step:
If there was no other way to do this horizontally I would first apply the stencil material, cut the letters, sand blast them, then hang a wet towel larger than the design on the front of the glass with a couple of box fans blowing on it to keep the glass chilled (continue wetting towel as needed). Then I would use a scoop coater (used in scoop coating silk screens) with piano wire as metering gauges to apply a thin even layer of heated thickened animal glue (about 1 to 1 or 1 to 1 1/2 glue to water) to the frosted letters. I would then train a gentle breeze on the glue until it gelled and in a while trim the excess glue from the letters. As the glue on the letters became firm and ready for the chipping stage I would tape a clear plastic "bubble" with some small vent holes at the top over the chipping area and pipe in some warm air from a small fan powered portable bathroom heater. Allow to chip over night. The dampened towel on the front would be removed at the same time the letters were ready to be trimmed.

Pat
http://www.decoglasspro.com

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