Signmaking 101: Adhering Photos to glass

An interactive section of TheLetterheads.com

Topics include: Sign Making, Design, Fabrication, Letterheads, Sign Books.

Off Topic Posts may be deleted at the discretion of the web hosts. ABSOLUTELY NO SHARING OF COPYRIGHTED FONTS, CLIP ART, or VIDEOS!

Please take social chit-chat elsewhere!

Moderators: Danny Baronian, Mike Jackson

Post Reply
Mike Jackson
Site Admin
Posts: 1686
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2004 11:02 pm
Location: Jackson Hole, WY
Contact:

Signmaking 101: Adhering Photos to glass

Post by Mike Jackson » Tue Aug 03, 2004 9:55 am

Doug Bernhardt mentioned his 1/3, /1/3, 1/3 mixture in a post earlier for adhering a photo, painting, card or similar paper image to the back of a piece of glass.

Here's Doug's (I think it came from Rick Glawson originally)
1/3 damar varnish 1/3 resin gel 1/3 bulletin spar or quick rubbing varnish

Personally, I had some problems using that formula. We were making glass Christmas Cards and I purchased a few real Christmas cards so I could include an old time Santa image. I have a feeling the thickness of the card caused my problems. Besides the possibility of not being perfectly flat, they did not fully absorb the mixture and I got trapped air bubbles by the next day. A few people have suggested making color photocopies of the original piece and using them instead. Other than the issue of color fastness, I can see the benefit knowing the piece of paper will absorb the mix and will have less tendency to want to curl or buckle.

A few people doing framed glass signs don't actually adhere the image to the glass, but instead glue it to a piece of masonite or matte board in the correct location. This works best if there is only a "window" of an area in the glass such as a open oval, square, or freeform shape. The backing board is then mounted into the frame so the image shows through the clear glass properly.

If you have a favorite recipe or method, please post it here.
Mike Jackson / co-administrator
Golden Era Studios
Vintage Ornamental Clip art
Jackson Hole, WY

Photography site:
Teton Images
Jackson Hole photography blog:
Best of the Tetons

Roderick Treece
Posts: 1048
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2004 8:04 pm
Location: San deigo Calif
Contact:

Post by Roderick Treece » Tue Aug 03, 2004 11:14 am

Awhile ago I did a few tests.
1) Ricks formula
2)Ricks formula plus lots of japan dryier and fiberseal
3)two part epoxy 30 minute

My favorite so far was the epoxy.Dries fast and when it kicks it's done.Rick's formula , useing historic materials would by it's very nature be slow setting and if you have the time to let it dry that's graet .Also it's more in line from a historic sense.

Roderick

Mike Jackson
Site Admin
Posts: 1686
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2004 11:02 pm
Location: Jackson Hole, WY
Contact:

Post by Mike Jackson » Tue Aug 03, 2004 11:34 am

The Weber's Res-N-Gel is the culprit. By design, it dries very slow. Personally, I think there is something better...but you also have to be careful knowing whatever mixture you use "could" attack the paint under it.

Mike
Mike Jackson / co-administrator
Golden Era Studios
Vintage Ornamental Clip art
Jackson Hole, WY

Photography site:
Teton Images
Jackson Hole photography blog:
Best of the Tetons

Larry White
Posts: 1140
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2004 4:18 am

Additional technique...

Post by Larry White » Tue Aug 03, 2004 11:35 am

I have also taken the picture and had it laminated in clear plastic much like a menu, then adhered it to the glass with the varnish mix. I would coat both the laminated picture and the glass with the varnish, then viewing the glass from the front, position the picture in place and work out any bubble from the center outward. Immediately after working the bubbles out, I would place the glass on a block of wood that I cut to same size and shape of the pictorial. Sometimes I would weight the glass. This seemed to help from any bubbles "sucking" back under the picture. I would then allow it to dry for a few days. I still prefer to just place the pictorial behind the glass whenever possible, it really makes life easier that way.
Larry White
That's enough for now... it's gettin' late
Town Of Machine
http://www.walljewelry.com

Doug Bernhardt
Posts: 1025
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 9:29 am
Location: Ottawa Canada
Contact:

Post by Doug Bernhardt » Tue Aug 03, 2004 9:10 pm

Gosh...this mixture worked great for me right from the beginning and yes, it was Rick's mixture...the bulletin spar was his adjustment. I have used it quite a few times for adhering canvas and did pretty much the same as Larry has mentioned. Rick used to apply it upside down and that NEVER worked for me....air bubbles, so I did it illustration facing the floor. Also kept a vinyl squeege handy and periodically sqeezed a bead of the mixture to the edge. After an hour or so everything was pretty much settled....although as a side bar, the bright lines back-up and any other decoration needs to be real dry!

Doug Bernhardt
Posts: 1025
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 9:29 am
Location: Ottawa Canada
Contact:

Post by Doug Bernhardt » Tue Aug 03, 2004 9:14 pm

A quick P.S.

Don't forget to coat both surfaces well....just read a little further down to Ron's post and reminded me

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests